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Posts tagged ‘cancer wristbands’

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Did you know that kids and dogs develop several cancers in common including bone cancer, brain cancer, lymphoma, and leukemia?
16,000 kids are diagnosed with cancer each year – with only 3 new kids cancer drugs in 20 years, there is little money behind new drugs- only 4% of NIH’s budget goes to pediatric oncology.
Some 4,000,000 dogs in the US are diagnosed with cancer; 50% of all dogs over the age of 10 die from their disease, and treatment options are limited for man’s best friend.

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Canines-N-Kids has made a unique practice of partnering the two. Treating and researching cancer in dogs can help us to treat children with the same cancers, furthering the effort in the fight against cancer, and developing better treatment options.

The organization will be using wristbands as a giveaway for their “Paws for a Cure Summit” which will be held June 12th in Washington, DC, as well as for their first annual “Two by Four Race Against Childhood & Canine Cancer” on October 1st, in Brambleton, VA. They eventually hope to offer them for purchase on their website. The bands feature their unique design and logo and will help share their message and raise awareness.

Reminderband is happy to feature this awesome organization and their cause.

To find out more, take a look at www.caninesnkids.org or find them on Facebook.

 

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About 1 in 8 women in the U.S. will develop invasive breast cancer in their lifetimes, making breast cancer one of the most common cancers in the United States. More than 200,000 new cases are diagnosed each year.

Breast cancer used to carry a stigma and was generally viewed as a very private disease. With the campaign to bring breast cancer into the open for increased awareness and to encourage women to get tested, National Breast Cancer Awareness Month has taken off. Millions of people now participate in breast cancer awareness events worldwide.

Lance Armstrong’s LIVESTRONG campaign brought about the widespread use of the rubber wristband as an awareness and fundraising tool for cancer victims and researchers. Today, the cancer wristband or “cancer bracelet” is used by educators, survivors, advocates, family members, researchers, and community organizers to indicate support, spread awareness, or raise funds. With the takeoff of breast cancer-related events, breast cancer awareness bracelets have also become a key part of the fight.

 

 

At Reminderband, we’ve added a selection of predesigned breast cancer awareness bracelets in the hopes that they inspire further creativity in your efforts to advocate, support, and inspire. View these breast cancer awareness bracelets and others or further customize and design your own at reminderband.com.

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Embossed-Reminderbands

Reminderband wristbands have been used for everything from family reunions to New Year’s resolutions to conventions, but one of the most frequent orders is for cancer bracelets. The silicone wristbands are inexpensive and long-lasting and work for both men and women, making them a popular choice for spreading awareness or personal use.

You can read more about cancer bracelets here, but here are some stories of folks and how they used cancer bracelets to help families, individuals, and communities, and advance the fight against cancers of all types:

  • Lung cancer survivor and advocate uses glow-in-the-dark, leopard-print cancer bracelets to educate her community about lung cancer and how it’s not just for smokers.
  • A football coach wears a cancer wristband for inspiration through chemo and practices.
  • How the city of Pittsburgh used cancer wristbands to benefit the leukemia and lymphoma society while supporting their mayor during his fight.
  • The vice president of the American Cancer Society Phoenix Metro Market on how wristbands help to raise awareness, funds, and support for cancer efforts.
  • How advocates are using cancer bracelets in the fight against brain cancer.
  • A family and a community in California uses cancer wristbands to raise funds for leukemia treatment.
  • High school students use memorial cancer bracelets to raise funds for a late student and teacher’s families.
  • Cancer wristbands were used to celebrate the end of chemotherapy for a patient in the Cayman Islands.
  • Cancer survivor Ben Teller uses Reminderband cancer bracelets to fundraise and build awareness for his organization, “Cuck Fancer.”
  • cancer bracelets ben teller
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What are cancer bracelets?

You have probably heard of awareness ribbons: symbols in different colors to raise awareness for the battle against certain diseases. For example, the pink ribbon represents the fight against breast cancer. Ribbons were tied on trees or pinned to lapels to bring attention to certain causes.

Nowadays, ribbons aren’t as common. Instead, wristbands, or cancer bracelets, can raise awareness and funds in the same way ribbons do, or just serve as a personal reminder — except they can be worn all the time, and by anyone, no pin necessary.

How are they used?

While all cancer bracelets spread awareness, they have a variety of uses and spread awareness in different ways. Cancer bracelets are worn by both women and men in the battle against cancer to show support for loved ones or as a personal reminder. Cancer bracelets are handed out at awareness events and hospitals and worn by families and survivors. Cancer awareness bracelets are also sold to raise funds for cancer research, pay for medical bills, or fundraise for a related cause.

For example, breast cancer bracelets are handed out at races, sold during October as part of Breast Cancer Awareness Month, or worn by friends and family of a survivor to promote breast cancer awareness.

How can they be made?

With a wide variety of uses, cancer bracelets need to be customizable. Reminderband cancer wristband bracelets can be made with any color, name, message, logo, symbol or art to fit any wrist. There’s no minimum order on Reminderband cancer bracelets, so you can order as few as one or as many as one million bulk custom bracelets.

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In the U.S. alone, someone is diagnosed with melanoma once every eight minutes. Someone dies from the fast-growing cancer every hour.

Mark Encin was one of them. After fighting cancer for two years, he lost his life to the disease. But his legacy lives on as his family, friends and supporters raise money for his cancer treatment center and a scholarship in honor of Mark.

In 2008, the Mark Encin Foundation promised to raise $50,000 for the Penn State Hershey Cancer Institute in the next five years. Through hosting events such as Casino Night and an annual Golf Outing, along with using Reminderband wristbands, the foundation is on its way to achieving its goal.

The PSHCI offers a better option for those seeking cancer treatment in central Pennsylvania, and the Mark Encin Foundation scholarship will assist a graduating senior from Mark’s alma mater in their efforts to seek an undergraduate degree.

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Although Mark was diagnosed with melanoma in 1996, the physician did not advise followup and Mark did not pursue treatment until eight years later, when he discovered a lump in one of his lymph nodes. Most Americans do not realize the danger of melanoma — something the Mark Encin Foundation seeks to remedy. The Mark Encin wristbands or cancer bracelets both benefit the foundation and promote awareness of this fast-growing disease.

Here are some facts and warnings about melanoma, courtesy of the Mark Encin Foundation:

  • “Melanoma is a form of skin cancer that begins in melanocytes, the cells that make up the pigment melanin. The cancer usually starts as a mole (skin melanoma), but can also begin in other pigmented tissues, such as the eye or in the intestines.
  • Most Americans do not realize the severity and seriousness of melanoma.
  • One in 50 Americans has a lifetime risk of developing melanoma, and nearly 69,000 are expected to be diagnosed in the United States with the disease in 2009, resulting in an estimated 8,650 deaths.
  • Melanoma is the fastest growing type of cancer in the United States.
  • The American Cancer Society estimates that the risk of developing invasive melanoma in the United States is 1 in 41 men and 1 in 61 women.
  • The incidence of people under 30 developing melanoma is increasing faster than any other demographic group, soaring by 50 percent in young women since 1980.
  • Melanoma is the most common form of cancer for young adults 25- to 29-years-old and the second most common cancer in adolescents and young adults 15- to 29-years-old.
  • Although melanoma is most common in Caucasians, melanoma can strike men and women of all ages, all races and all skin types.”
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